Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 10th International Conference on Geriatrics Nursing and Palliative Care Holiday Inn – Marne La Vallée Paris, France.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Joost Degenaar

Hanze University, Netherlands

Keynote: The role and competences of health professionals in a new healthy ageing approach

Time : 09:30-10:10

Conference Series Geriatrics Nursing 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Joost Degenaar photo
Biography:

Joost Degenaar has graduated from Utrecht University in 1989. He worked in higher health education, mostly in nursing education and curriculum development, and was director of Education and |Research at Hanze University of Applied Sciences. Since 2013 he is director of the centre of Expertise Healthy Ageing, a public private partnership in which Hanze University collaborates with 150 partner organizations in 20 innovation labs on innovation in health care. Questions and challenges from professional practice and a interdisciplinairy approach are starting point for innovation. Nursing research and education is an important part of the activities.

 

Abstract:

Demographic Change and Health is an important theme all over the world. It is one of the grand societal challenges of the European Union: we have an fast ageing population, people live longer but with more chronic diseases, and the cost of health and social care increase. Solutions are to be found in a combination of prevention, innovation, technology and entrepreneurship. 

Active and healthy ageing gives a fruitful approach to solve the challenges of demographic change and health. In the Netherlands, Healthy Ageing not only focusses about older people with diseases: we have a life cycle approach, from growing up healthy to growing old. The focus is on functioning and health and participation. We use a new definition of health as the ability to adapt and selfmanage in the face of social, physical and emotional challenges. Nurses play an important role in this approach.

In the international ELLAN project, a European Core Competence Framework is developed for health and care professionals working with older people.In this framework, assessment performance indicators are specified for each CanMed role. In October 2018 a new book is published, in which from the background of healthy ageing and demographic change, these competences are described .

The roles of (geriatric) nursing in this Healthy Ageing approach:

  • Strengthen selfmanagement and resilience of patients
  • Contribute to prevention and health literacy of citizens
  • Focus on functioning and the ability to adapt and selfmanage
  • Use interdisciplinary innovative methods in health improvement like health technology.

 

Keynote Forum

Dr. Elia Gourgouris

The Happiness Center, USA

Keynote: Intentional happiness: “7 Paths to Lasting Happiness”

Time : 10:10-10:50

Conference Series Geriatrics Nursing 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dr. Elia Gourgouris photo
Biography:

Elia Gourgouris Ph.D. is the president of The Happiness Center – an organization dedicated to creating personal success and happiness. Over the last 25-plus years, as a passionate promoter of optimism and deeply meaningful relationships, he has helped thousands of people achieve happiness and fulfillment, both in their careers and in their personal lives.

Dr. Elia is the author of the #1 Amazon Best-Selling book, 7 Paths to Lasting Happiness. In it, he helps readers identify and work through principles such as gratitude, personal branding, and forgiveness which everyone can apply to their lives for deeper, more meaningful and lasting happiness.  He has published over 120 articles for various newspapers and magazines, including the Huffington Post.

Abstract:

What is Happiness? Aristotle answered this by saying "Happiness is the meaning and purpose of life, the whole aim and end of human existence" Happiness is a choice!  It is also attractive, healthy, and being connected, but it takes effort.

That being said, what inhibits our happiness, and how can mental health and nursing practitioners find happiness and fulfillment in their professions, when far too many suffer from profession burn-out, due to the high stress nature of their jobs.  In my keynote, I will address practical tools that are applicable to both them and their patients.  Several factors have a direct impact on our level of life satisfaction and fulfillment, including fear (of change, fear of success, and fear of failure), comparisons, selfishness, the burden of perfectionism, lack of forgiveness (and self-forgiveness), our inner critic, and toxic relationships.  When these mental and emotional roadblocks are removed, our inner joy will be freed from constraints and returned to our awareness.

The 7 Paths to Lasting Happiness reviews several of these roadblocks and provides both principles and “take action exercises” for individuals to learn from, and through its application to ultimately achieve genuine happiness, including:

1st Path: Loving Yourself  a)Personal Brand b) Perfectionism c)Inner Critic d)Comparisons

2nd Path: Gratitude a) Attitude of Gratitude  b)University of Adversity

3rd Path: Forgiveness a)Forgiveness equals freedom b) Self-forgiveness is the key

4th Path: Follow Your Passion a) Getting out of your comfort zone brings growth

5th Path: Nourish Your Spirit a) Faith vs Fear b) Meditation & Purpose

6th Path: Loving relationships a) Love languages  b) Criticisms & Toxic relationships c) Authentic listening  d) Trust

7th Path: Service a) The antidote to selfishness

Thousands of individuals have taken this life satisfaction survey, and various graduate students throughout the world, (including Singapore, UK, and The Philippines and others) have used it as part of their graduate thesis.  It is intended as a tool measuring current level of happiness. It could be used before and after treatment to show changes in level of happiness http://thehappinesscenter.com/survey/survey.php

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break & Group Photo 10:50:-11:05 @ Le Foyer

Keynote Forum

Ambre Kalene

EPRTH™, France

Keynote: Panic disorders, take charge, without the help of words or substances

Time : 11:05- 11:45

Conference Series Geriatrics Nursing 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ambre Kalene photo
Biography:

I am Ambre Kalène, Swiss naturopath for more than 30 years with hundreds of patients. During my practice, I quickly realized that the people coming to consult me were, as soon as they got better, returning to their old destructive behaviors. I tried to understand and then channel the impulses. This allowed me to craft a technique, a procedure, which I use and have been teaching for several years. 

Abstract:

Every day, in their professional practice, health professionals are confronted with people whose behavior opposes, sometimes violently, any approach.

These panic disorders are always part of their life pattern. They do not arise spontaneously without it being based on a weakening life course of events.

But what can be done when this state of panic bursts does not allow: a necessary injection, the taking of a medicine, a surgical intervention or simply a discussion, an interview, or a psychological interview?

These people are not all delirious. Most of the time, they are individuals who fell prey to an extreme disorder in a punctual situation of their life. They are then "overwhelmed" by a weakened survival system, an impulse, that they can not calm voluntarily.

However, it is possible to calm, in a few minutes, without medication, this system, to allow the caregiver to act effectively. It is a simple, easy to implement procedure, even with people who do not speak the caregivers' language.

This procedure may also allow,  if desirable, for a background treatment of the various traumas that have led the person to fall into this state.

Conference Series Geriatrics Nursing 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Joost Degenaar photo
Biography:

Joost Degenaar has graduated from Utrecht University in 1989. He worked in higher health education, mostly in nursing education and curriculum development, and was director of Education and Research at Hanze University of Applied Sciences. Since 2013 he is director of the Centre of Expertise Healthy Ageing, a public private partnership in which Hanze University collaborates with 150 partner organizations in 20 innovation labs on innovation in health care. Questions and challenges from professional practice and a interdisciplinairy approach are starting point for innovation. Nursing research and innovation of nursing education is an important part of the activities.

Abstract:

In our ageing societies it is important for all of us to stay as healthy as possible. Health professionals play an important role in this. Healthy Ageing is one of the grand societal challenges and important for individual persons and for societies. Health professionals focus on health and wellbeing of older people they work with.

However, there are many different definitions of health and healthy ageing, and they can have huge effect on the approach of older people by health professionals.

In this workshop three definitions are compared: The curent WHO definition of health as “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being”, a new definition of Positive Health, as “the ability to adapt and self manage in the face of emotional, physical and social challenges” and the ICF approach with functioning as central theme as a result of interaction between health conditions and contextual factors.

Research on positive health shows that there are important differences in the evaluation of different dimensions of health between different stakeholders like patients, policy makers, health providers and health professionals.

The discussion in the workshop will be about questions like: how does your definition of health influence your work with older people? What factors help or obstruct? The implications of a new vision on health and healthy ageing can have a big impact on your approach, on health education  and on the organization of health care.

  • Hospice and Palliative Care| Palliative Drugs and Medication| Psychiatric Palliative Care| Oncological and Terminal Palliative Care| Neonatal and Pediatric Palliative Care| Palliative Care Management
Location: Paris
Speaker

Chair

Dr. Elia Gourgouris

The Happiness Center, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Marie Conception Leocadie

Sorbonne Paris City University, France

Speaker
Biography:

Joost Degenaar has graduated from Utrecht University in 1989. He worked in higher health education, mostly in nursing education and curriculum development, and was director of Education and |Research at Hanze University of Applied Sciences. Since 2013 he is director of the Centre of Expertise Healthy Ageing, a public private partnership in which Hanze University collaborates with 150 partner organizations in 20 innovation labs on innovation in health care. Questions and challenges from professional practice and a interdisciplinairy approach are starting point for innovation. Nursing research and innovation of nursing education is an important part of the activities.

 

Abstract:

In our ageing societies it is important for all of us to stay as healthy as possible. Health professionals play an important role in this. Healthy Ageing is one of the grand societal challenges and important for individual persons and for societies. Health professionals focus on health and wellbeing of older people they work with.

However, there are many different definitions of health and healthy ageing, and they can have huge effect on the approach of older people by health professionals.

In this workshop three definitions are compared: The curent WHO definition of health as “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being”, a new definition of Positive Health, as “the ability to adapt and self manage in the face of emotional, physical and social challenges” and the ICF approach with functioning as central theme as a result of interaction between health conditions and contextual factors.

Research on positive health shows that there are important differences in the evaluation of different dimensions of health between different stakeholders like patients, policy makers, health providers and health professionals.

The discussion in the workshop will be about questions like: how does your definition of health influence your work with older people? What factors help or obstruct? The implications of a new vision on health and healthy ageing can have a big impact on your approach, on health education  and on the organization of health care.

 

Break: Lunch break 12:45-13:30 @ Food & More
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Beverly Dexter, a US Navy Commander (Retired) with over 35 years of military experience, served on 4 shipboard tours, and tours with US Marines and Special Forces stateside, and Joint Service with US Marines and US Army in Iraq. A leader in the treatment and prevention of trauma, she founded  Military Special Interest Groups for the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies, and the EMDR International Assoication. In continuing humanitarian work, she also has provided Planned Dream Intervention training at no cost, to groups in England, India, Israel, Zimbabwe, Australia, Canada and across the US.

Abstract:

Planned Dream Intervention (PDI) is a highly effective, rapidly learned skill that teaches the dreaming brain how to sleep through nightmares.  Developed by Dr. Beverly Dexter in 2001 and taught to thousands of clients (including in an active combat zone),  health care providers and educators around the world. PDI is dramatically different from previous therapies that require multiple sessions, an established therapy relationship, continued follow up if more disturbing events occur, and is much more acceptable to the large percentage of nightmare sufferers who would never pursue traditional therapy or who might not have in-person access to therapy.  Briefly, the successful PDI is: 1) an intuitive emotion-gut creation; 2) may not necessarily be the first thing the individual thinks of; 3) the ‘emotional volume’ of the effective PDI matches that of the dream at the point where the dreamer woke up; 4) the successful PDI is not re-writing the dream—it kick-starts the person back into the dream with a sense of mastery; 5) if the dream is about a real life event, the PDI that will work may not necessarily appear to be related to what the dreamer would like to have happen in real life;  and 6) effective dream interventions can be created from physical sensations or emotions, even when the individual does not remember actual dream content.  PDI training creates a mastery experience allowing the dreamer to sleep through any dream without waking or acting out dream content, now and in the future.

Nan Nelson

Northcoast Behavioral Healthcare, USA

Title: Women's mental health, treatment of perinatal mood disorders

Time : 14:45-15:05

Speaker
Biography:

Nan Nelson, MD, Psychiatrist in Cleveland, Ohio, USA,  was given the award of America’s Top Psychiatrists in 201. She has published four books, including Treatment of Perinatal Mood Disorders

Abstract:

Twenty percent of women and 10 percent of men around the world experience clinical depression. While most people believe that pregnancy is relatively protective against mental illness, recent research has indicated that up to 20 percent of pregnant women suffer from some type of anxiety or mood disorder during their pregnancy. One out of every eight to ten postpartum mothers or four hundred thousand per year reportedly have postpartum depression (PPD). According to the American Academy of Pediatricians, eight hundred thousand US women suffer postpartum depression. This is a misunderstood, misdiagnosed, and mistreated diagnosis and an underdiagnosed obstetrical complication, and an estimated 50 percent of cases go undetected. Every woman who gets pregnant is at risk of having a mood disorder.

Postpartum psychosis is a qualitatively different illness from postpartum depression and strikes one out of every 1,000 deliveries. Risk factors include a history of psychosis, bipolar disorder and having had symptoms of mental illness in the past. Those with postpartum psychosis are at a substantially increased risk of committing suicide and/or infanticide. These acts are the result of devastating biological disorders, not a conscious choice. But with proper diagnosis and intervention, there is recovery and tragedies tied to untreated psychosis can be avoided. Because these mental illnesses are so prevalent, more research is necessary to determine whether there are any long-term consequences to the fetus or newborn exposed to the various psychotropic medications available.

Postpartum Risk assessment after delivery, PPD depression scales, PPD, baby blues, PTSD, anxiety disorders, Drug screening for Opiate use, and treatment with Psychopharmacology during pregnancy and breastfeeding are some of many topic revolving and relating to Women’s Mental Health.

Gabriel Rafi

Paris Descartes University , France

Title: AVAA-Accompaniment to Active Living and Autonomy

Time : 15:05-15:25

Speaker
Biography:

Gabriel RAFI has completed his master’s degree at the age of 24 years from Paris Descartes University. He is neuropsychologist, the director of CIERA, a regional association for the professionals and the director of DEVACCESS, a company that aims to develop projects related to health. He has published one book on cognitive remediation and acts as a lecturer and professor in universities.

Abstract:

Despite the development of structures and associations for children (1 in 100 births) with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and behavioral Disorders in recent years, there are still few adult structures or places too limited. In addition, these institutions are subject to age constraints of their users. Some adults find themselves without solutions and can sometimes lose skills previously solicited or emerging and thus move away from any inclusion project. Today, in Europe, the unemployment rate for adults with autistic disorders varies between 76 and 90%. In 2015, there were 5,400 French adults with disabilities living in Belgian institutions. It is to fill this gap that we have developed  the AVAA program in order to best meet the needs of this audience, initially requiring support towards autonomy, in the broad sense of the term, from daily life to social and professional inclusion through access to employment. AVAA is aimed at 18-30 year olds with behavioral and learning difficulties. The goal is to offer these people and their families support : educational, therapeutic and professional. AVAA offers learning times oriented towards professional integration and the regulation of behavior. These times are broken down into learnings set up by the educational team : computer science, langage and mathematics. Also proposed is a work in behavioral, cognitive and social remediation, through therapeutic workshops performed by external stakeholders. AVAA also offers support for families, both in terms of administrative procedures and support and listening, through parenting conferences and the provision of qualified professionals.

Seeling Tan

Tutti Art, Malaysia

Title: Expressive art as medicine for mental health issues

Time : 15:25-15:45

Speaker
Biography:

Seeling Tan is an artist and art educationalist who is specialises in working with children and young adults with learning differences. She is currently based in Kuala Lumpur Malaysia and provide intensive training for young artists diagnosed with Autism, Asperger’s Syndrome, Dyslexia, Dyspraxia and Down’s Syndrome. She is also a picture book maker, illustrator and author of three books “Discovering Serenity” (2009),“Sketches and Drawings around Orosei Sardinia” (2017) and

“Expressive Art as therapy- an insight with special needs” (2018). She was with Horizon Expatriate School Malaysia as an art educator from 2001 to 2010. In 2011 she set up Tutti Art Club to promote the works of special needs artists providing a sustainable platform for many of her students who are now able to create bridges on their own to promote their work. Her passion in teaching also motivate her to volunteer at Chin Student Organization (CSO) Refugee School as art educator young children.

She is actively involved in art exhibitions, talks and workshops on child psychology development through art.

Abstract:

Introduction: Art has been widely recognized as a form of visual language since ancient time. Art making is not a play thing but rather a continuous journey of exploring and learning about the self and a therapeutic tool for people who are dealing with mental issues. Mental illness like depression and anxiety, can happen to anybody at any age. It does not matter your career. One can be a successful actor, singer, author, designer, writer, husband, wife or a child. People who are suffering from mental illness often find themselves having issues with self-Identity. A child can even suffer from depression and anxiety at the young age due to trauma they have experienced. Children suffering from war, women being captured into sexual slavery or being abused by their partners, men having problems with relationships and the list goes on. Unfortunately not everyone is willing to open up to their problem and reach out for help.

How do you know you are having Depression and Anxiety? The feel good mood comes and go like a roller coaster. The mode of happiness is not consistent meaning one day one can be extremely happy and in a split second one can be sad when something triggers their sensitive feelings. It is like pressing the “wrong button /switch” the mood will just change.

How many of us are familiar with this kind of feelings? Identify and accepting is an important step to trying to find ways to manage the feelings. There are many ways to manage depression and anxiety when one is aware of experiencing this burnout that may feel like one is scrapping on rough road. Talk about it. Be more open to our inner feelings and emotions.

Stop being silent and share your difficult feelings and emotions with people you can trust. Reaching out is the first step to self-healing. We must end the stigma of not talking about mental illness that affects most people lives.

What is Expressive Art? Expressive art is a form of artistic expression whereby one is focuses on the process of making art at that moment.  It is often spontaneous and unfinished. It can be a process that combines other elements like music and dance with making art. There has been a growing interest in art in health initiative where the process of art making is seen as a therapeutic and healing for children and adults who have learning differences and mental health issues.

How Expressive Art can manage depression and anxiety? Engaging in art can help people with mental issues stay in the present moment. This activity also promotes the art of mindfulness because the mind and the body work together at the moment. It helps to put the mind at ease from other worries that have been stuffing and pressuring in the brain. Expressive Art helps a person stay conscious, centered and focused, allowing the mind to relax and let the energy of the body take over in the art making process. At the moment of mindfulness, art making process can even stimulate thoughts and ideas at the subconscious level. The process can open up the senses in our body and helps the flow of energy. Channeling the energy into symbols, lines, shapes and colours. Many people who suffer from depression, sadness, pain and anxiety disorders find art making as a safe and practical tool to release their feelings, thoughts and emotions.

This presentation includes slides showing images of paintings and explaining the feelings, emotions and transformation of energy from art making. The presentation also encourages participants to register for a workshop on Expressive Art (- a room to just being me).

Break: Networking Break 15:45-16:[email protected] Foyer

Olessia Gorkovenko

University of South Africa, South Africa

Title: Constructive emotional intelligence pedagogical technology and spiritual aspect

Time : 16:00-16:20

Speaker
Biography:

Olessia Gorkovenko, she is currently a Ph.D. (Psych) student at UNISA in South Africa. She runs a center “Pilatelicious” in Johannesburg, she is fellow in the WCP organization. She has published papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of Journal (ispcp-trcp.org/about.html). She wrote book Spiritually Evolved. She has a passion for teaching and coaching and is extremely meticulous in achieving the best results. She will work with her students and clients, then ensures that no mistakes are made and clients are staying motivated. She will carefully check with assessments and strategies, training routines, nutrition plans and therapeutic advice. If she has a suggestion to make, she won’t hesitate to do so if it’s in her client's benefit and will help them to achieve better results. That’s her main goal and purpose, to help clients become better and achieving perfect results. She operates on the fundamentals of positive psychology approaches that focus on the performance improvements as a result of holistic development. Olessia is a firm believer of best practices. She is always willing to share knowledge and collaboration between stakeholders in order to reach a common goal.

Abstract:

In the 21st century modern organisations are looking to differentiate themselves. Companies have begun to realise that merely relating on the emotional (EQ) and rational (IQ) levels and relying on the skills of their staff does not offer sufficient progress towards meaningful existence and the purpose of the organisation, to renew vision, and to overcome the complex problems facing staff, and so sustain the survival of the organisation. Covey explains that effective leaders in the organisation “consistently practice the four attributes of human personality: physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual” (at p. 38). Following the same direction, Strack and Fottler (2002) state that organisations where at least some of the leaders are more spiritually intelligent are more likely to implement the practices of effective leadership, such as empower others; challenge the process; inspire a shared vision; direct behaviour; and encourage the heart. Watkins (2003) argues that organisations have started to recognise the importance of the value of a person as a whole, more from a spiritual perspective than just as someone who brings the required skills for the job. Neal (2001) refers to the increasing awareness of Spiritual Intelligence in the workplace shown by organisations. Between 1999 and 2012, Koenig, King and Carson (2001) estimate that more then 3000 articles and studies which were published on the topic of spirituality.

Now an increasing number of companies have started incorporating spiritual intelligence training, skills, practices and transformation into their system of organisational development. Many business schools, and scientific, management, health research journals accept and recognise spirituality as an important and crucial area for study and research in the 21st Century.           

Spirituality is the ultimate level of intelligence, with or without any religious bias, to help one understand oneself. Neal (2001) highlighted that during periods of economic downturn, people become demotivated and start looking beyond conventional materialism for meaning and purpose in life. 

Stress at work and home has increased various stress-related health problems. This has made people tune into such concepts and practices as yoga, meditation, pilates, mindfulness, spiritual music and prayer. If an employee spent more than seven hours at the workplace and especially in the IT/ITES industry with typically extended working hours, there is a need for the organisation to look for methods and practices to relieve stress and anxiety. Work-life-family balance has become essential today. Several corporates in the US, France, India, Russia and England have opted for such programmes as the Achieving Personal Excellence offered by the Art of Living Foundation and similar programmes. Conger et al. (1994) refer to the workplace as a community rather than a neighbourhood. When more and more people reach the level and state of self-actualisation, their need for spirituality also increases as indicated by Maslow (1994). 

Shikher Shrestha

National Institute of Neurological and Allied Sciences, Nepal

Title: P-SSIH- Predictors of shunt dependency in spontaneous hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage

Time : 16:20-16:40

Speaker
Biography:

Shikher Shrestha did his FCPS Neurosurgery (Fellow of College of Physicians and Surgeons, Pakistan) at 33 years of age on 2016. Currently, he is working as a consultant Neurosurgeon at National Institute of Neurological and Allied Sciences, Bansbari, Kathmandu, Nepal; where he got his formal training in with his mentor Prof. Devkota, pioneering Neurosurgeon in Nepal. He has worked in stroke management since the early phase of his training and has even published the paper on First thrombolysis in stroke in Nepal. He is a member of Nepalese Stroke Association and was in the organising committee 1st International Nepalese Stroke Conference 2017. His current interest is in the field of Neurovascular surgery and has been practising the same in Nepal.

Abstract:

Predictors of Shunt dependency in Spontaneous Hypertensive Intracerebral Haemorrhage (P-SSIH): Spontaneous Intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH) has a significant toll on morbidity and mortality with estimated annual affection of >1 million people worldwide. The most common risk factor being uncontrolled hypertension. The incidence is even higher in Asian population, partly due to limited care for hypertension and non-compliance. Frequently, SICH is complicated by acute hydrocephalus, necessitating emergency CSF diversion with a subset of patients, ultimately requiring long-term permanent Shunt diversion. The factors predicting need for ventricular shunt placement in SICH patient population is unclear. We try to analyse various factors that might have significant contributory effect for the need for long-term shunt placement in SICH patients.We performed a retrospective analysis of 48 patients out of 125 patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage intervened surgically at National Institute of Neurological and Allied Sciences, Bansbari, Nepal between 2015 to 2017. A multiple logistic regression model was developed to identify independent predictors of shunt-dependency after SICH. We included various clinical, radiological and interventional variables. Infratentorial Location of SICH, volume, initial hydrocephalus, intraventricular extension of bleed, third ventricular ballooning, need for craniotomy and initial EVD placement has a significant association for predicting long term shunt dependency; though does not show significant increase in risk.

 

A Macieira-Coelho

INSERM, France

Title: Aging happens by default

Time : 16:40-17:00

Biography:

A Macieira-Coelho is a Research Director at the French National Institute of Health. He received an MD from the University of Lisbon, Portugal, and a PhD from the University of Uppsala Sweden. He made an internship at the University Hospital in Lisbon and was a Research Associate at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia (USA) and at the Department of Cell Biology of the University of Uppsala (Sweden). He became Head of the Department of Cell Pathology at the Cancer Institute in Villejuif (France) and was a visiting Professor at the University of Linkoping (Sweden). He published 150 papers in professional journals and 9 books on cancer and aging. He received the following awards: Fritz Verzar Prize (University of Vienna, Austria), “Seeds of Science” Career Prize (Lisbon, Portugal), Dr. Honoris Causa (University of Linkoping, Sweden), Johananof International Visiting Professor (Institute Mario Negri, Milano, Italy).

Abstract:

Attempts to find the cause of aging focused in general on one specific aspect of the functioning of the organism. Theories considered the phenomenon either as the result of wear and tear, a depletion of a potential, a programmed type of event or of some kind of advantage for the survival of the population where natural selection would play the main role. A theory like the protein error hypothesis has a cultural origin, it is based on the belief common to different cultures that human are finite because of the accumulation of faults. Theories like the rate of living or the stress theory are based on the depletion of a reserve. The endocrine theory sees aging as a programmed event. The immune theory envisioned aging as a progressive functional decline of the immune system. The cross-linking or free radical theories focalize on a molecular event in a universe of metabolic reactions. Evolutionary theories explain aging as the action of genes modulated through natural selection. We believe that it is hopeless to look for a particular cause of aging there is simply no other alternative. One has to look for the phenomenon of aging in terms of the basic requirements needed for life to persist; the most fundamental requirement is energy expenditure, which inevitably follows the second law of thermodynamics. The data that support this view will be described.

Umur Kayabasi

MD, Bahcesehir University, Istanbul –TR

Title: Misfolded Proteins in the Retina

Time : 17:00-17:20

Speaker
Biography:

Umur Kayabasi is a graduate of Istanbul Medical Faculty. After working as a resident in Ophthalmology, he completed his clinical fellowship program of Neuroophthalmology and electrophysiology at Michigan State University in 1995 After working as a consultant neuro ophthalmologist in Istanbul, he worked at Wills Eye Hospital for 3 months as an observer. He has been working at World Eye Hospital since 2000 He has chapters in different neuro- ophthalmology books, arranged international symposiums, attended TV programs to advertise the neuro- ophthalmology subspecialty. He has also given lectures at local and international meetings, plus published papers in neuro-ophthalmology. He became an assistant professor at Uskudar University- Istanbul in 2015

 

Abstract:

Background: Recent research suggests that Tau is the culprit lesion along with neuroinflammation in the etiology of Alzheimer' s Disease ( AD ).  Retina is the extention of the brain and is the most easily approachable part of the central nervous system.  Detection of the pathological protein accumulations may be possible by using spectral domain optical coherescent tomography ( SD-OCT ) and fundus autofluorescein ( FAF ).  There is evidence showing that retinal plaques start accumulating even earlier than the ones in the brain.  Most recent Tau protein images in the brain consist of normal or reverse C-shaped paired hellical filaments.

 Methods: 20 patients with PET proven AD were examined by SD-OCT and FAF.  Mean age was 72. Hypo or hyperfluorescent retinal  lesions were scanned by SD-OCT and C shaped paired hellical filaments were investigated in a masked fashion.  The researchers agreed on the shape of the lesions. Both C-shaped ( normal or reverse ) filaments and thinner  fibrillary structures were taken into consideration.

 Results: In all the patients, paired hellical filaments that exactly corresponded with the histopathologic and cryo-EM images of Tau in terms of shape and dimension were detected along with thin fibrils and lesions similar to amyloid beta.  The number of the retinal filaments  and other abnormal proteins was in concordance with the severity of the disease process. The advanced retinal filaments had normal or reverse paired C shapes and thin fibrils had the shape of histopathologic images seen in early developmental stages of the disease.

 Conclusions: Retinal images of Tau were disclosed for the first time in live AD patients.  Retinal neuroimaging is a trustable biomarker and tool for monitoring the disease.