Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 10th International Conference on Geriatrics Nursing and Palliative Care Holiday Inn – Marne La Vallée Paris, France.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Satwant Singh

North East London NHS foundation trust, UK

Keynote: Hoarding disorder: New horizons

Time : 09:00-09:40

Conference Series Geriatrics Nursing 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Satwant Singh photo
Biography:

Satwant Singh is Nurse Consultant in CBT & MH and Professional and Strategic Lead for IAPT. He has been facilitating the monthly London Hoarding Treatment Group since 2005, engaged in research with Kings College London and with colleagues in understanding HD using Visual Methods in developing interventions to deal with hoarding issues, facilitated workshops and training in this field and CBT Satwant has co-authored the UK’s first self-help book titled Overcoming Hoarding published by Robinson Press self-help book based on CBT techniques for individuals, family members, carers and professionals.

Abstract:

Hoarding disorder or compulsive hoarding as it was previously known has until recently received little attention. However with the increased media attention and the introduction of Hoarding Disorder in the DSM V as a condition in its own right has increased in the awareness, understanding and identification of individuals with haording issues. The media has proved to be a double edge sword in both highlighting the disorder and increasing the stigma and discrimination of individuals with hoarding issues.  Despite the increase in presentations within mental health services, there is a lack of a specific service available for the treatment of Hoarding Disorder. Hoarding Disorder presents a challenge for a range of professionals in dealing with this presentation due to its complexity and the impact it has on individuals, family and carers and the community at large. Limited research into this disorder has shown Cognitive Behavioural Therapy to be an effective intervention. However there is no specific treatment model. In our experience the treatment of hoarding issues requires a holistic approach combining both a cognitive behavioural and experiential interventions to address both the overt and covert underlying issues that individuals present with. In addition to helping individuals with hoarding issues  reclaim their space attention needs to be given to assist individuals integrate back into soceity by reclaiming their life and building on their resilience.

Keynote Forum

Pat Gwyer

British Psychological Society, UK

Keynote: The Smarter-Life-Growth approach to wellbeing, happiness and success

Time : 09:40-10:20

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Biography:

Dr Gwyer is a world-leading expert in Wellbeing, Happiness and Success. His integrative approach combines applied psychology and the work of John Maxwell, the world leading authority on leadership and personal growth. On completing his PhD, he worked as a researcher for a UK law enforcement agency and taught at several universities. In 2006 he completed his second doctorate in Clinical Psychology and then an MSc in Applied Positive Psychology and Coaching Psychology. He specialises in consultancy for individuals and organisations and is the Clinical Advisor for The Mountain Way (http://mountainway.org) a specialist veteran charity promoting Post Traumatic Growth.

Abstract:

By combining aspects of Applied Cognitive, Clinical, Coaching and Positive Psychology together and adding elements of tried and tested growth and leadership techniques from world leading authorities such as John Maxwell, a practical approach to improving wellbeing, happiness and success has been created in the SMARTER-life-GROWTH approach. This integrative, trans-functional and holistic approach, adopts a practical skills-based way of helping individuals restore, maintain and improve their sense of wellbeing, happiness and personal, professional and performance success. Further by integrating different aspects of an individual’s experience (e.g., the Biological, Psychological, Social and Spiritual) and through applying a stepped staging framework, a single coherent understanding of an individual's life journey is created. This allows the approach to support individuals along the wellness continuum, from struggling and suffering through to flourishing, thriving and meeting their potential. This presentation outlines the theoretical and applied underpinnings of the SMARTER-life-GROWTH approach as well as how wellbeing, happiness, and success performance indicators, and goals can be identified and fulfilled through a variety of evidence-based interventions. The approach acknowledges the unique potential that all human beings have, the natural flutations in welleness that occur and empowers individuals to have greater autonomy over their life so they can be more resilient, and successful in the separate (but interconnected) aspects of their life. Thus allowing them to create and lead the life they want to lead, and to have the confidence, skills and ability to protect this against the natural adversities that we all face.

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break 10:20-10:35 @ Le Foyer

Keynote Forum

Aram Cargill

Change Challenge and the Adaption Apex Lab, Australia

Keynote: The dark triad (Narcissism, Machiavellianism, and Psychopathy) in the information age into the age of augmentation

Time : 10:35-11:15

Conference Series Geriatrics Nursing 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Aram Cargill photo
Biography:

Aram Cargill is the director of The Adaption Apex Lab and Change Challenge working alongside Dr Kaalii Cargill who completed her PhD in psychology and Melbourne University Australia. She has been the past President of SCAPE (Society of Counselling and Psychotherapy Educators) and ISOCSS (International Society of Clinical and Counselling Supervisors), and past Vice-President of PACFA (Psychotherapy and Counselling Federation of Australia). As well as working in private practice (Kairos Centre ) for 40 years. Aram Cargill is also on the board of directs for Ledsen and an executive director a Kanga innovation. Working together the two have adapted DARE ( Deception Analysis Reasoning Engine ) for advanced lexical psychometric testing through mobile phone technology  

Abstract:

The digital age has made deception manipulative profiles far more attractive and simpler, not only for predatory behaviour but also in terms of the developing personality.

As the information age develops into the age of augmentation (Harris 2016 ), our understanding of ourselves becomes ever more relevant  as our digital identities grow in importance and stature.  

In the light of this, understanding what has been referred to as “the dark triad”  (Paulhus & Williams, 2002 ) or negative personality traits on a day to day, pedestrian level becomes ever more important. The very fact that our digital identities express not only our conscious choices but also our subconscious wants and desires and unconscious needs, it is important that our profile of the dark triad becomes more refined. If left in the “dark”, these traits may become evident in some type of externalised event. Narcissism, machiavellianism, and psychopathy are encouraged and exacerbated by technology (Twenge & Foster, 2010). These personality traits have become ever more alluring and seductive because of ability to construct digital identities that may take precedence over authentic identities.

We have steered away from general profiling and testing of these traits because of the criticisms of verbal descriptors of individual differences (lexical hypothesis) especially in in terms of the dark triad because of negative language and its impact on self-description.

The developments in artificial intelligence identify attitudes, emotions, and moods during lexical hypothesis testing, and give the framework greater extension and accuracy in trait profiling of individuals. This in turn gives more proficiency to language-based profiling of the dark triad. Developments in the cost-effectiveness of big data support this. 

Our society now requires greater base line awareness, observation, monitoring and management long before the deception manipulative profiles of the digital age hit the radar in negative consequences or predatory behaviour.

Keynote Forum

Charles Edwards

Advance Telehealth Consulting Services, LLC and One TeleMed, LLC, USA

Keynote: Advancing Mental Health with Telepsychiatry & Psychiatric Mental Health nurse practitioners

Time : 11:15-11:55

Conference Series Geriatrics Nursing 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Charles Edwards photo
Biography:

Charles Edwards is the Chief Executive Officer and Founder of Advance Telehealth Consulting Solutions & One Telemed, LLC. Charles has over 22 years of behavioral health experience, where he managed outpatient and inpatient psychiatric programs across the country. During that time, Charles discovered the need for expanding mental health services to underserved communities and decided to step away from his corporate position to develop service model to assist with the mental health shortage.

Abstract:

According to The State of Mental Health in America 2018, 18% (43 million) of adults in the country have a mental health condition (3). In addition, youth mental health is worsening and access to care is limited. In a five-year period, rates of severe youth depression have increased from 5.9% to 8.2%. Over 1.7 million youth with major depressive episodes did not receive treatment. To meet the need for mental health services, providers would have to treat six times as many people than providers in the states where there is a lower prevalence of mental illness and higher rates of access to care. These problems experienced in the U.S are also evident in mental health across the globe (4).

The mental health provider shortage has persisted throughout the United States for decades. The shortage of mental health providers has produced an influx of patients who are not receiving appropriate timely mental health care. Telepsychiatry is reducing this shortage and reshaping the way organization address mental health provider shortages in the United States and abroad. “Telepsychiatry is believed to provide better access and higher-quality care to patients who need psychiatric care and cost savings to providers of such care.” (1).
 
Psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners (PMHNPs) are assuming increasing clinical responsibilities in the treatment of individuals with mental illness as the shortage of psychiatrists and their maldistribution continues to persist in the United States (2). PMHNPs are critical components to reducing the shortage of providers and increasing access to patients in need of mental health services.

Keynote Forum

Ambre Kalene

EPRTH™, France

Keynote: Panic disorders, take charge, without the help of words or substances

Time : 11:05- 11:45

Conference Series Geriatrics Nursing 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ambre Kalene photo
Biography:

I am Ambre Kalène, Swiss naturopath for more than 30 years with hundreds of patients. During my practice, I quickly realized that the people coming to consult me were, as soon as they got better, returning to their old destructive behaviors. I tried to understand and then channel the impulses. This allowed me to craft a technique, a procedure, which I use and have been teaching for several years. 

Abstract:

Every day, in their professional practice, health professionals are confronted with people whose behavior opposes, sometimes violently, any approach.

These panic disorders are always part of their life pattern. They do not arise spontaneously without it being based on a weakening life course of events.

But what can be done when this state of panic bursts does not allow: a necessary injection, the taking of a medicine, a surgical intervention or simply a discussion, an interview, or a psychological interview?

These people are not all delirious. Most of the time, they are individuals who fell prey to an extreme disorder in a punctual situation of their life. They are then "overwhelmed" by a weakened survival system, an impulse, that they can not calm voluntarily.

However, it is possible to calm, in a few minutes, without medication, this system, to allow the caregiver to act effectively. It is a simple, easy to implement procedure, even with people who do not speak the caregivers' language.

This procedure may also allow,  if desirable, for a background treatment of the various traumas that have led the person to fall into this state.

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Location: Paris

Session Introduction

Jean Manuel Morvillers

Sorbonne Paris Cité University, France

Title: Hospitalization in psychiatry 60 years and over: Peculiarities and normalities. A quantitative study

Time : 11:55-12:55

Speaker
Biography:


Jean-manuel Morvillers is a Nurse and PhD in Education Sciences, he was the main coordinator of a research on the therapeutic Alliance funded by the DGOS as part of the Program of Nursing and Paramedical Research (PHRIP) in 2013. He is currently in charge of research and projects within the geronto-pole of Ile de France: Gérond'IF

 

Abstract:


Introduction: According to the WHO, mental illness affects 15% of people aged 60 and over, and these disorders sometimes require hospitalization in psychiatry.

Objective: The main objective of our research was to measure the Therapeutic Alliance (AT) score in hospitalized psychiatric patients and to compare the scores of patients over 60 years old with those under 60 years of age.  

Method: This is a cross-sectional, multicenter descriptive study conducted in four Parisian general psychiatric hospitalization centers. The STAR-P scale, translated into French by us, adapted to hospitalization and self-reported, was used to obtain the TA score between patients and nurses. Sociodemographic data as well as primary and secondary diagnoses were collected and analyzed.

Results: 240 patients were included including 41 people over 60 years old. The TA scores for the entire population included a normal distribution tending toward the highest scores (Median 10.0, IQR [8.0-12.0]). The descriptive analysis of the participants shows 5 variables with a significant difference between the 2 groups: the marital status (only 48% are single for 60 years and over vs. 68.8% p = 0.03), the living conditions: 37 , 5% of 60 years and older are owners vs. 9% (p less than 0.0001), the associated diagnosis 25% of those 60 years and older have mood disorders vs. 7.9% (p = 0.03), the mode admission to free hospitalization (65.9% vs. 48.7% p = 0.04) and the first visit to the Center Médico-Psychologique (CMP) for outpatient follow-up after discharge from hospital (97.4% vs 83.4%). , 7%, P = 0.02). The TA scores are comparable between the two populations and show rather favorable results [median 11.0 (8.0-12.0 and mean 9.9 (2.2)], for 26.8% of respondents this was their first hospitalization. Conclusion: People over 60, hospitalized in general psychiatry have a good therapeutic alliance with the nursing teams and they go massively to their first post-hospitalization appointment. It remains to show that there is a significant link between these two indicators.

 

Break: Lunch break 12:55-13:[email protected] Food & More

Olessia Gorkovenko

University of South Africa, South Africa

Title: Effective short-term program for building Constructive Emotional Intelligence

Time : 13:40-14:40

Speaker
Biography:

Olessia Gorkovenko, she is currently a Ph.D. (Psych) student at UNISA in South Africa. She runs a center “Pilatelicious” in Johannesburg, she is fellow in the WCP organization. She has published papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of Journal (ispcp-trcp.org/about.html). She wrote book Spiritually Evolved. She has a passion for teaching and coaching and is extremely meticulous in achieving the best results. She will work with her students and clients, then ensures that no mistakes are made and clients are staying motivated. She will carefully check with assessments and strategies, training routines, nutrition plans and therapeutic advice. If she has a suggestion to make, she won’t hesitate to do so if it’s in her client's benefit and will help them to achieve better results. That’s her main goal and purpose, to help clients become better and achieving perfect results. She operates on the fundamentals of positive psychology approaches that focus on the performance improvements as a result of holistic development. Olessia is a firm believer of best practices. She is always willing to share knowledge and collaboration between stakeholders in order to reach a common goal.

Abstract:

Introduction

In this post-materialistic era, the basic needs of many people are constantly changing.  This is in the workplace, together with family, social, organizational and global needs. Labour activity becomes more significant and progressive, where employees have high creative potential and the opportunity to improve themselves. To improve this direction, leadership in the workplace should be based on a higher level of Cognitive Intelligence (IQ), Emotional Intelligence (EQ), Spiritual Intelligence (SQ), and even Artificial Intelligence (AI). Cognitive and Emotional Intelligence has become more common, while Spiritual Intelligence and Artificial Intelligence are in the early stages of development.

In the world and in psychology there is a growing interest in Emotional Intelligence (EI) and Spiritual Intelligence (SQ).

Labour activity becomes more significant and progressive, where employees have high creative potential and the opportunity to improve themselves.

It is for us - specialists in mental health it is necessary to solve this issue because only we stand next to the sea of the abundance of the different psychological and psychotherapeutic techniques attaining high psycho-emotional and spiritual qualities. What kind of psychological qualities can we talk about?

As our experience has shown, these are the following four psychological emotional qualities - inner calmness, - internal relaxation, - benevolence, - emotional stability. It is these qualities that give strength to the main tool of the specialist - his good mood, which, as is known, is contagious, especially in the children's environment.

When we talk about the spiritual, it is in the context of a bio-psycho-socio-spiritual paradigm.

About the program

In the process of the master class: - two concepts of Emotional Intelligence (EI) - the Western (Mayer, Salovey, Caruso) and Russian constructive model (Tabidze) will be used. New psychodiagnostic techniques will be given, allowing to measure all these qualities and establish a new psychological indicator of SQ  - high or low, EQ - the degree of emotional maturity of a person - that it is the formation of the positive degree of emotional maturity of EQ that is the key to achieving high Emotional Intelligence - a new theory of personality will be presented showing how much Emotional Intelligence depends on the psychophysiology of a person and his unconscious processes - a new model of the psyche overcoming the limitations of the models of Freud, Myasischev, Wayne, Gurdjieff will be presented - it will be shown how this new model and emotional maturity are related to the moral, spiritual qualities of a person. - and, finally, it will be shown that it is the high emotional intelligence that is the basis of bodily health, the condition of family happiness and creative longevity.

In the definition of Spiritual Intelligence (SQ), the Zohar Danas model (1997) will be presented that describes Spiritual Intelligence (SQ) - as an innate human need to understand oneself, "about oneself" and understand others more deeply. She proposed 12 principles to describe Spiritual Intelligence and Self-Consciousness.

The model of the King (2009) will also be mentioned. He defined Spiritual Intelligence as a set of adaptive mental abilities based on intangible and superior aspects of reality. Specifically, they "contribute to understanding, integration, and adaptive application of the intangible and superior aspects of their existence. They lead to a profound existential reflection, increase in significance, recognition of the transcendental self, and mastery of spiritual levels. King’s (2009) a 24-item questionnaire to be used in this Master Class (training).

Participants

The master class is intended for psychiatrists, psychotherapists, psychologists, social workers, nurses and other assisting professions and is aimed at improving both their emotional and spiritual qualities.The aim is to build skills in achieving a high degree of emotional maturity and spirituality. This is helpful in upgrading and improving professional education in the psychotherapeutic field.

 

 

Speaker
Biography:

Jay Ostrowski is the Director of the TeleBehavioral Health Center of Excellence and the CEO of Behavioral Health Innovation, creators of Adaptive Telehealth software. Jay is as a subject matter expert on Telebehavioral Health for the United State Federal Government. He's pioneered research on the laws/ethics of telemental health, founded the Board Certification in Telemental health, created 9 peer-reviewed courses in telemental health, created 10 software applications for telehealth, and continues Telebehavioral health research with Harvard University and the University of Virginia. Jay holds a Master’s degree in Counselling Psychology and is a Licensed Professional Counselor and Licensed Supervisor

 

Abstract:

Peer-reviewed, multidisciplinary, and focused on best-practices, this seminar is a quick-start guide derived from extensive research and applies to international audiences. The same author created the Board Certification in Telemental Health (BC-TMH) for the Center for Credentialing and Eduction in the United States that launched in 2018. This practical seminar was created from the most comprehensive study to date of international laws, ethics, best practices and efficacy research on the topic of telebehavioral health and the collective experience of 20 telebehavioral health experts. The extensive literature review included the 46 related terms for mental and behavioral health services delivered over the internet that are found in the research and popular literature. The professions included are (in US terms) medical doctors, nurse-practitioners, psychologists, social workers, professional counselors, addictions therapists, and marriage and family therapists.

Telebehavioral Health solves many provider shortage and access problems for mental and behavioral health services around the world. Developing safe, effective, and sustainable services requires knowledge in a wide range of areas in addition to mental and behavioral health training. with this in mind, a specific process is presented for efficiently creating or improving a telebehavioral health program and can be applied to a small single clinic or an extensive multi-hospital network. The process is flexible enough to be applied to most all scenarios. Areas of focus include efficient program development, funding, selecting settings, selecting and setting up service offerings (psychiatry, medication-assisted therapy, psychological assessment, counseling, peer-coaching, clinical supervision, self-help, etc.), internet security selecting secure video software, setting up online workflows, provider and patient adoption strategies and how to prevent the most common program failures. Particular attention is paid to differences between clinic-to-clinic work and direct-to-consumer (in patient home) work where setup, security, software and best practices differ.

 

 

Speaker
Biography:

Xu Xiaofeng is a graduate student at Sichuan University,China.Her major is Geriatrics Nursing.She has published some articles in indifferent journals. She has done a series of research on Geriatrics Nursing.Hu Xiuying is professor and has published more than 100 articles in in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.
 

 

Abstract:

Objective: To investigate the current situation of the activities of daily living (ADL) of the aged at home in western China, and to analyze its influencing factors so that we can improve the quality of life and pension services of elderly people.

Methods: The elderly people who came from Qinghai Pro-vince, Ningxia Autonomous Region, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, Shanxi Province, Guizhou Pro-vince, Guangxi Province, Sichuan Province, Yunnan Province and Chongqing were surveyed by questionnaires. Logistic regression model was used to analyze the influencing factors of ADL.

Results: A total of 7 175 aged people living in the western China were surveyed. In the study, 78.86% of the aged at home could independently live. 12.32% of the aged were of mild dysfunction. 6.27% of the aged had mode-rate dysfunction. And 2.55% of the aged suffered severe dysfunction. Multiple Logistic analyses indicated that age, educational level, economic income, body mass index and disease were the factors that affected their ADL. The risk of decreased ADL in the 60-69 and 70-79year-old groups were 0.221 (95%CI: 0.190-0.258) and 0.353 (95%CI: 0.305-0.409) times that of the elderly over the age of 80. Compared with illiterate seniors,the risks of decline in ADL of primary school, junior high school, secondary or high school, college or undergraduates, postgraduates or above were 0.299 (95%CI: 0.140-0.637), 0.312 (95%CI: 0.146-0.663), 0.238 (95%CI: 0.112-0.510), 0.226 (95%CI: 0.105-0.484), and 0.238 (95%CI: 0.110-0.514) times. The declines in the risk of ADL for elderly people with quite difficult economic conditions, slight difficulty and breaking even were 2.720 (95%CI: 2.015-3.672), 2.344 (95%CI: 1.816-3.027), and 1.542 (95%CI: 1.215-1.957) times of the economically abundant people. Compared with those with a body mass index (BMI)≥28, the risk of ADL reduction for BMI<18.5 was 1.577 (95%CI: 1.142-2.179) times. And the ADL of the elderly with no disease was at the risk of falling 0.685 (95%CI: 0.602-0.779) times that of an elderly person with the disease.

Conclusion: The activities of daily living of age at home of western China are not high, and affected by many factors, such as age, educational level and so on. With the increasing of the elderly, maintaining and improving the ADL are the problems and challenges that we are faced with.

 

 

 

 

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break & Poster Presentaion 15:20-15:[email protected] Le Foyer
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Session Introduction

Wang Lingying

Sinchuan University, China

Title: Disease burden in chinese dementia patients:A bibliometric analysis

Time : 15:50-16:10

Speaker
Biography:

Wang Lingying is studying in West China School of Medical,Sichuan University for master nursing degree.She is a student cadre.

 

 

Abstract:

Objective:  To provide a reference for further research on the burden of dementia patients by studying the relationship between the burden of disease in dementia patients and the existing problems.

Methods:  Bibliometric analysis was conducted on the main contents and related characteristics of the literatures in CBM, VIP, CNKI and WanFang databases. Results  A total of 147 articles were included in this studyand about 122 articles(83.0%) were periodical ones. Literatures from Beijing enjoyed the largest share of 24 articles(16.4%); 86.4% of the first author were from hospitals and universities;All articles were published in 76 kinds of journals and Chinese Journal of Gerontology had the biggest share, about 5.4%; Cooperation degree of the authors was 3.21 and coauthor rate was 74.8%. Most research objects were caregivers, accounting for 57.8% and 6.8% of the literatures were carried out in multidimensional burden. 45 papers were supported by funds and 22 literatures were cited more than 20 times.

Conclusion:  The research on the burden of disease in dementia patients is more and more concerned by researchers. However, the quality, breadth and depth of overall research need to be strengthened to improve the research and reduce the burden of dementia patients.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Vernita Annette Marsh has completed her PhD in Clinical Psychology from Michigan State University and her Pre-doctoral and Post-doctoral training from Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Hospital. Following this training, she has completed a Fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital. Currently, she is the Founder of a group clinical practice, Dr. Vernita Marsh & Associates and she is also the Founder of The Marsh Clinics®, an organization to address the disparities concerning mental health care. Most notably, she has served as a Consultant, Supervisor, and Mentor for clinicians. She has published, presented, and offered several trainings in the various topics of Mental Health

 

 

Abstract:

The use of telehealth is rapidly changing; how one interfaces with healthcare including mental health services. A model is proposed specifically for reaching and servicing clients in the urban and undeserved communities via the use of telehealth to reduce the social stigma of mental health care. Considerations of the use of telehealth including the ethical and legal ramifications of mental health for this population are elucidated. Multicultural and interdisciplinary perspectives are also visited. Both the advantages as well as the challenges of telehealth are discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

Linda Roberts received her Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Toronto and her Master’s degree from the Wurzweiler School of Social Work. She is the Assistant Manager of the Greenberg Academy for Successful Living, Hospital for Special Surgery. She has presented at national conventions as well as local organizations reaching a wide variety of professional and public audience.

Abstract:

Background: It is vital for physicians and surgeons to communicate successfully with older adults, who often perceive themselves as stigmatized and powerless in healthcare settings. Communication with older adults is complicated by age-related issues (such as cognitive decline) as well as negative stereotypes about older adults and aging, which are an occupational hazard for healthcare workers, who encounter the most vulnerable elderly. Successful patient communication leads to better recall of information, compliance, adherence to medications, satisfaction, and overall better outcomes.

Methodology: At Hospital for Special Surgery, in NYC, we developed a two-part training program (ongoing for 8 years) comprised of: 1) small-group interactive didactic sessions on aging issues; and 2) workshop demonstrations given by the residents to a group of older adults, followed by a question and answer session. Residents were assessed using a 22-item pre–post questionnaire covering medical knowledge of aging, attitudes toward older adults, and personal anxiety about aging. Older adult participants were surveyed for perceptions of residents’ sensitivity toward them. Seventy (70) PGY3 residents, for whom the program is a requirement, and 711 older adult participants, participated over 8 years.

Results: Older adult participants: Of 711 participants, 648 (91%) responded; 96% strongly agreed/agreed that the residents had demonstrated sensitivity toward them. Residents: Of 70 residents, 35 (50%) were assessed. Mean knowledge scores increased significantly (p≤0.001); five of nine attitude items (p≤0.05) and one of four anxiety items improved significantly (p≤0.001).

Conclusions: In addition to significant increase in knowledge scores, significant change was seen in residents’ attitudes and anxiety levels toward older adults, attributes that are usually deep seated and hard to change. Our program enables residents to learn and realistically practice universal underlying communication skills in order to maintain effective and sensitive communication with this vulnerable population. Further research is needed to evaluate if this training program is replicable to other specialty resident programs

 

Speaker
Biography:

Linda Roberts received her Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Toronto and her Master’s degree from the Wurzweiler School of Social Work. She is the Assistant Manager of the Greenberg Academy for Successful Living, Hospital for Special Surgery. She has presented at national conventions as well as local organizations reaching a wide variety of professional and public audience.

Abstract:

Background: It is vital for physicians and surgeons to communicate successfully with older adults, who often perceive themselves as stigmatized and powerless in healthcare settings. Communication with older adults is complicated by age-related issues (such as cognitive decline) as well as negative stereotypes about older adults and aging, which are an occupational hazard for healthcare workers, who encounter the most vulnerable elderly. Successful patient communication leads to better recall of information, compliance, adherence to medications, satisfaction, and overall better outcomes.

Methodology: At Hospital for Special Surgery, in NYC, we developed a two-part training program (ongoing for 8 years) comprised of: 1) small-group interactive didactic sessions on aging issues; and 2) workshop demonstrations given by the residents to a group of older adults, followed by a question and answer session. Residents were assessed using a 22-item pre–post questionnaire covering medical knowledge of aging, attitudes toward older adults, and personal anxiety about aging. Older adult participants were surveyed for perceptions of residents’ sensitivity toward them. Seventy (70) PGY3 residents, for whom the program is a requirement, and 711 older adult participants, participated over 8 years.

Results: Older adult participants: Of 711 participants, 648 (91%) responded; 96% strongly agreed/agreed that the residents had demonstrated sensitivity toward them. Residents: Of 70 residents, 35 (50%) were assessed. Mean knowledge scores increased significantly (p≤0.001); five of nine attitude items (p≤0.05) and one of four anxiety items improved significantly (p≤0.001).

Conclusions: In addition to significant increase in knowledge scores, significant change was seen in residents’ attitudes and anxiety levels toward older adults, attributes that are usually deep seated and hard to change. Our program enables residents to learn and realistically practice universal underlying communication skills in order to maintain effective and sensitive communication with this vulnerable population. Further research is needed to evaluate if this training program is replicable to other specialty resident programs

Background: It is vital for physicians and surgeons to communicate successfully with older adults, who often perceive themselves as stigmatized and powerless in healthcare settings. Communication with older adults is complicated by age-related issues (such as cognitive decline) as well as negative stereotypes about older adults and aging, which are an occupational hazard for healthcare workers, who encounter the most vulnerable elderly. Successful patient communication leads to better recall of information, compliance, adherence to medications, satisfaction, and overall better outcomes.

Methodology: At Hospital for Special Surgery, in NYC, we developed a two-part training program (ongoing for 8 years) comprised of: 1) small-group interactive didactic sessions on aging issues; and 2) workshop demonstrations given by the residents to a group of older adults, followed by a question and answer session. Residents were assessed using a 22-item pre–post questionnaire covering medical knowledge of aging, attitudes toward older adults, and personal anxiety about aging. Older adult participants were surveyed for perceptions of residents’ sensitivity toward them. Seventy (70) PGY3 residents, for whom the program is a requirement, and 711 older adult participants, participated over 8 years.

Results: Older adult participants: Of 711 participants, 648 (91%) responded; 96% strongly agreed/agreed that the residents had demonstrated sensitivity toward them. Residents: Of 70 residents, 35 (50%) were assessed. Mean knowledge scores increased significantly (p≤0.001); five of nine attitude items (p≤0.05) and one of four anxiety items improved significantly (p≤0.001).

Conclusions: In addition to significant increase in knowledge scores, significant change was seen in residents’ attitudes and anxiety levels toward older adults, attributes that are usually deep seated and hard to change. Our program enables residents to learn and realistically practice universal underlying communication skills in order to maintain effective and sensitive communication with this vulnerable population. Further research is needed to evaluate if this training program is replicable to other specialty resident programs

Speaker
Biography:

Torill Landgraff Bratlie has an Advanced master’s Degree in education (Cand.Paed.) from University of Oslo, Norway. Her field is adult learning psychology in organizations and organizational culture development. She has later studied practical neuro scientific tools and hypnosis techniques, voice dialogue method, non-violent communication, yoga teaching, Buddhism and Tibetan meditation, all at private schools in Scandinavia. She has extensive experience within the field of organizational culture development and leadership development from her clients. She has worked for global companies like Coca-Cola, Tomra, BDO, Subsea7, and for national organizations at all sizes in both private and public sector in Norway.

Abstract:

A few years ago, I went into a deep depression and life gave me an opportunity to transform. The trials along my journey taught me how to «lose my mind» and let go of what I previously believed was my life. I changed the pictures I had in my head, changed the words I kept saying to myself, and chose to go for the unknown! Every day for almost 3 years in a vast variety of situations, I asked myself and others: “what is love in this situation?” That’s how I gradually learned to overcome tremendous mental pain and start to visualize, emotionalize and realize my deepest desires. As a coach for other people through the past 18 years, with a higher university degree and more than 6000 coaching sessions as a professional coach, I took my own medicine! Now I can share and create from a new place and give back the elixir that I found. I will contribute by sharing my perspectives on mental health and what love has to do with it, through the eyes of an academic with almost 20 years’ experience in the field of leadership development, living real life with tough experiences. Working with top management leaders daily, I have found strong needs among clients to understand the connections between mental health at work and how we treat each other. That’s why I have been recreating the concept of finding love at work and how we can utilize and benefit from our relationship capital.

 

 

 

Biography:

Sharon Stecher is a Board Certified Advanced Practice Nurse since 1989. Her work spans a variety of settings with numerous populations. She also taught Nursing for 15 yrs. Her work experience covers hospital, outpatient, office and clinical settings. She diagnoses and treats patients over 16 years of age covering the spectrum of Psychiatric Disorders. She works in collaboration with a doctor in a very busy Psychiatric practice, although much of her work is solo with a doctor for collaboration and post review of records. She is a Member of the ANA, MONA, and Sigma Theta Tau. She holds BSN and MSN(R) degrees from St. Louis University

Abstract:

Disorders of mood generally effect particular aspects of an individual’s mood. The person experiencing a disorder of thought, such as schizophrenia, becomes more isolated and has problems to communicating with the outside world. They are unable to discern reality from fantasy. People with mood disorders have better relationship skills. People with disorders of thought have very poor interpersonal skills and have an extremely poor support system. We will discuss the bipolar spectrum. People experiencing these disorders frequently have comorbid diseases. Other problems such as PTSD, addictions, ADHD, chronic medical illnesses, TBI, etc, lead to a more complex and integrated treatment approach. Other issues, such as denial of disease and medication non-compliance lead to frequent relapses of not just the bipolar, but all their comorbid diseases. Bipolar I disorder is perhaps the best known and frequently discussed. PT’s in the acute state usually require in-PT stays. Bipolar II disorder is much less known and often misdiagnosed for many years. Some of these PT’s also require in-PT stays. Mixed episodes: these are the least understood of the mood disorders. They are frequently misdiagnosed or missed altogether. Genetics and family history will be discussed in relationship to the disease along with research that has been completed demonstrating brain inflammation and decrease in brain volume with psychotic episodes. Current research also demonstrates that the brain also has some ability to heal itself. Other applicable research findings will be presented. Current treatment modalities and medications to treat the complex issues these patients suffer will also be discussed. Short and long term treatment strategies will be addressed. Life path for recovering patients will be discussed if time allowed. Patients are never cured of these diseases; they can become much better at managing their symptoms and be proactive in their treatment.

Speaker
Biography:

Zidan Khalaf Murad has completed his MSc from University of Duhok. Currently, he is working as Assistant Lecturer at College of Nursing-University of Duhok.

 

Abstract:

Post-traumatic stress disorder is a psychiatric disorder that happens after an individual witnessed or experienced traumatic or terrifying event such as killing, threatening, kidnapping, and sexual or physical abuse, etc., that induce a serious danger to someone’s life. The present study was established in order to assess the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder among Shengalian internally displaced persons. A descriptive, retrospective study design was conducted from the period of 1st of November, 2015 through 12th of May, 2017 in order to collect data related to assessing post-traumatic stress disorder among Shengalian internally displaced persons. A cluster-simple random sampling approach was used to recruit 400 subjects. A questionnaire was developed as a tool of data collection for the purpose of the study. Data were collected through using PTSD Checklist Civilian Version and adopting direct interview technique. Pilot study carried out to determine the content validity through the panel of (7) experts, and the reliability of the study’s instrument was determined through application of test-retest reliability. Analysis of data was performed through the use of Descriptive and Inferential Statistical methods. The findings of the study showed that the prevalence of PTSD among Shengalian IDPs in this study is 14.5%. The study concluded that post-traumatic stress disorder is more prevalent among female than male.